Past Events

Language Emergence and Development in the Absence of Conventionalized Linguistic Input

Dr. Rabia Ergin

March 2, 2020 16:00

Engineering Building, B-443

Language Emergence and Development in the Absence of Conventionalized Linguistic Input

Human communication system, language, is unique and so distinct from all other systems because we manage to transfer the nuances in meaning and virtually any thought we have in our minds with some degree of precision into another person’s mind. The crucial question is "how does a human language come about from scratch?" In order to address this question, I present evidence from three studies conducted on Central Taurus Sign Language (CTSL). CTSL is a young sign language that emerged within the last half century in the absence of a conventionalized language model. Today it is used by 25 deaf and approximately 80 hearing signers in a mountainous region in south-central Turkey. First, I show the degree of lexicalization of form-meaning mappings in signs for everyday objects. Second, I present evidence for the emergence and conventionalization of various word orders as argument markers. Finally, I demonstrate the emergence and conventionalization of distinctive morphological markers to express predicates signaling symmetry and reciprocity. The three studies together portray the architecture of a young system under construction.

Speaker Bio: Rabia Ergin is a research group leader at Bogazici University Cognitive Science program, Istanbul/Turkey. She established her research group upon receiving the BIDEB-2232 International Fellowship for Outstanding Researchers grant by TUBITAK. Her main research interests are the emergence of linguistic features in micro-community sign languages and language processing –more specifically, morphological processing in spoken languages.

For her TEDx talk on the Central Taurus Sign Language you can click here.

On the contribution of contour mechanisms in early visual cortex to shape perception: a comparative study of neural networks and statistical modeling

Dr. Funda Yıldırım

February 24, 2020 16:00

Engineering Building, B-443

On the contribution of contour mechanisms in early visual cortex to shape perception: a comparative study of neural networks and statistical modeling

The visual system tends to group clusters of similar parts into a single shape. The perceived shape of such an object – consisting of many similar small parts – can be manipulated by creating a perceptual conflict between the orientation and the position of the parts. This has the interesting consequence that the position of parts and intermediate illusory contours can appear displaced compared to their physical position. Here, we used this shape-dependent change in perceived position as a pointer to identify visual regions involved in shape perception. We hypothesized that if the percept of a shape is primarily evoked bottom-up through (illusory) contours generated at an early level in visual cortex, it should be possible to read-out the displaced contour activity in V1 and V2, as these areas have previously been associated with contour integration. On the other hand, if it is the perceived shape that drives the perceived positional change of the parts and contours, activity in early visual cortex should reflect the physical position of the parts and not differ depending on the perceived shape. We present the results obtained via recurrent neural networks and population receptive field models and discuss their congruency. Last but not least, we use this case to argue how machine learning can be utilized to shed light on cognitive neuroscience studies.

Menstrual Cycle and Resting State Functional Connectivity in Schizophrenia: An fMRI Study

Handan Noyan, PhD

February 17, 2020 16:00

Engineering Building, B-443

Menstrual Cycle and Resting State Functional Connectivity in Schizophrenia: An fMRI Study

In this presentation, she will introduce their research conducting as a doctoral dissertation, and she will discuss the effects of the menstrual cycle on brain resting state functional connectivity together with hormonal and clinical findings in patients with schizophrenia, and in healthy controls.

Final Projects Presentations: Research Methods in Cognitive Science

December 23, 2019 16:00

Engineering Building Room A-412

Final Projects Presentations: Research Methods in Cognitive Science

You are all invited to participate in the Mini Symposium where Cognitive Science Masters Students will present their final projects on interdisciplinary fields of Computer Engineering, Psychology, Philosophy and Linguistics.

COGS502 Final Project Presentation Program

Humor Theories and Creating a Model That Can Generate Humorous Text

Gökhan Akgün

February 27, 2019 17:30

Engineering Building Room A-442

Humor Theories and Creating a Model That Can Generate Humorous Text

Artificial Intelligence proved its ability to achieve some cognitive tasks such as learning and problem solving. It’s usage has been expanded to wider areas with the rise of deep learning techniques. Humor is one of the most challenging area, considered as proof of the intelligence by most people. In this presentation, we will examine the underlying theories of the humor, and then, we will discuss what kind of approach should be used to create a good model that can generate humorous text in comparison to other attempts.

An Intelligent Tutor Using Deep Learning Techniques

Yusuf Can Semerci, PhD candidate

February 27, 2019 17:30

Engineering Building Room A-442

An Intelligent Tutor Using Deep Learning Techniques

With the rapid increase in the demand of web-based education systems, creating an e-tutor that can understand its users and adapt to their needs became crucial. Hence, the intelligent tutorship has become an important work field for user modelling approaches. This thesis proposes an intelligent tutor that is equipped with user modelling, adapting and recommendation capabilities. The model will be constructed with the behavioural and physiological data obtained from users by their interactions with the system. This model will adopt concepts from the flow framework. The Convolutional Neural Networks and Long Short-Term Memory Networks will be used to generate primitives of the collected data. These primitives will be transformed and evaluated into higher level abstractions which are called Experience, Exploration and Attention. The relation between these abstractions will determine which recommendations and adaptive tests should be given to the user. The system will be tested with Architectural History students using an e-learning platform developed to accompany the proposed model.

Research Methods in Cognitive Science Projects

Mini Symposium

January 8, 2019 15:50

Law Building Room Z-10A

Research Methods in Cognitive Science Projects

You are invited to attend the Cognitive Science Program's Mini-symposium where all first year students will present their final projects of the Research Methods course.

Consciousness, Identity And Consciousness-Identity Interaction According To A Comparative, Multidisciplinary Perspective

Dr. Burçak Özkan

November 26, 2018 16:00

Engineering Building Room A-412

Consciousness, Identity And Consciousness-Identity Interaction According To A Comparative, Multidisciplinary Perspective

With this presentation, it is suggested that a reversible interaction exists between consciousness and identity and that, it is necessary to adopt a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective in order to establish an appropriate evaluation of this interaction. With this purpose, first of all, it is inquired which disciplines may be helpful and what kind of informative knowledge should and must be expected from these research areas so that a convenient analysis of the interaction mentioned above could be obtained and the scientific and social problems related to this interaction could be resolved. After then, the conceptual framework of the concepts of "consciousness", "identity" and the definition of "the interaction between consciousness and identitiy" are determined and clarified. Finally, some scientific and social problems accepted to be related to this interaction and the extensions provided by such a comparative-multidisciplinary point of view are exhibited and exemplified.